Tag Archives: LOST IN TRANSLATION

10 Ways to Live Life Like Bill Murray

bill-murray-the-tao-of-bill-murray-shutterstock_291103331“When Bill Murray went to Japan to film the indie classic Lost in Translation back in 2002, he brought along a little novelty book called Making Out in Japanese,” writes Paul Teetor in LA Weekly.

” It included colloquial phrases for lovers such as ‘You have a beautiful body’ and ‘I don’t want to get married yet.'”

Teetor continues:

For a guy with such a mischievous mind and sly wit, the comic possibilities were endless. Soon after he arrived in Tokyo, he told a startled Japanese crew member, ‘I really don’t love you anymore, so I’m going to change my phone number.’ ”

When he went out for sushi, he would ask the chefs — scowling men wielding big knives — questions such as “Do your parents know about me?” or “Do you have a curfew?” or “Can we get in the backseat?” On special occasions, he would even ask them “Do you mind if I use protection?”

It could have been perceived as yet another ugly American abusing the native language for his own twisted entertainment. But because it was Murray delivering these intimate lines with his typical wacky charm and offbeat sense of humor, there were no international incidents, just laughs all around.

It was just part of the Tao of Bill.

If that sounds a bit mysterious, it’s all explained in Gavin Edwards’ new book, The Tao of Bill Murray: Real-Life Stories of Joy, Enlightenment and Party Crashing (Random House, $26). Even by the crazy-is-normal standards of Hollywood characters, Murray is a quirky guy. He has no agent and no manager, just a voice mailbox, which he rarely checks, where writers, producers and directors can pitch their projects. Sometimes months later they will get a 30-second phone call: I’ll do it. And there’s no telling when he will actually show up on the set.

Fittingly, then, Edwards has written an equally quirky book. At first glance it looks like a standard biography, and it does include a 33-page introduction that outlines Murray’s life. It starts with his Sept. 21, 1950, birth in a Chicago suburb, details his showbiz start in Chicago’s Second City and his breakthrough performance on Saturday Night Live, and includes most of his film roles all the way through to September 2014, when Edwards interviewed him at the Toronto Film Festival.

The bio-introduction is bookended by a 106-page filmography, in which Edwards analyzes Murray’s role in every one of his 59 films, including classics Caddyshack, StripesGhostbusters, Tootsie, Groundhog DayRushmore and the aforementioned Lost in Translation.

But the heart of the book is the middle 150 pages, in which Edwards breaks down the 10 Principles of Bill. Tao is Chinese for “the way,” and the 10 principles make the case that Murray has a unique way with people that has made him one of the most beloved — and enduring — actors in a business where sell-by dates come and go awfully quickly.

In an interview, Edwards admitted that even he isn’t sure exactly what literary category his book fits into. “A friend said, ‘I think you’ve invented a new form of biography,’ and it certainly is a different approach to biography,” he says. “But I think it also works as a guide to how to live your life. I think people would benefit from following the Tao of Bill. And as a simple bathroom reader, it has a whole lot of funny stories.”

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08:  Actor Bill Murray tees off from the 2nd tee of Spyglass Hill Golf Course during the first round of the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am February 8, 2007 in Pebble Beach, California.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

 

Indeed it does. Like the day in 1987 when Murray, who loves baseball almost as much as he loves golf, had the privilege of sitting in for legendary Chicago Cubs broadcaster Harry Caray during a Cubs-Montreal Expos game. Rather than try to replace Caray, Murray later said, he approached the job from the point of view of the rabid Cubs fan that he is. That led to a series of memorable quips during what he later described as “the peak of my performing career.”

On Montreal’s first batter: “Starting for the Expos in left field, Casey Candaele. He’s no good.” On fans in the Wrigley Field bleachers: “These are people who take bad falls down the stairs and don’t really know.” On fans yelling to him in the broadcast booth: “Nice to see the gang from Joliet maximum security prison here.” On cutting off beer sales after the eighth inning: “Anybody who can’t get drunk at the ball game before the eighth inning doesn’t belong here.” On why he was happy the Cubs’ Rick Sutcliffe was pitching so well during the 7-0 victory: “Frankly, he owes me money.”

Just for the record, here are the 10 Principles of Bill that Edwards came up with after interviewing more than 50 people who know Murray and reviewing hundreds of Murray anecdotes recounted in newspapers, magazines and books. (Keep in mind that these are something Edwards came up with, not principles that Murray claims to live by.) “When I was interviewing him in Toronto, I realized that my suspicions were right, that all Bill’s crazy behavior wasn’t just random wackiness,” Edwards says. “He had put a lot of thought into things like why he crashes parties and why he is so generous with his money.”

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The 10 Principles:
1. Objects are opportunities.
2. Surprise is golden. Randomness is lobster.
3. Invite yourself to the party.
4. Make sure everybody else is invited to the party.
5. Music makes the people come together.
6. Drop coin on the world.
7. Be persistent, be persistent, be persistent.
8. Know your pleasures and their parameters.
9. Your spirit will follow your body.
10. While the earth spins, make yourself useful.

Most of them are self-explanatory. For those that aren’t, well, invite yourself to the party, put on some music, drop some coin and buy the book.

 

Indeed, the book sounds like it is a lot of fun, and perhaps it is enlightening too. Here’s what the publisher has to say about it: 

This collection of the most epic, hilarious, and strange Bill Murray stories, many of which have never before been reported, spotlights the star’s extraordinary ability to infuse the everyday with surprise, absurdity, and wonder.

No one will ever believe you.

New York Times bestselling author Gavin Edwards, like the rest of us, has always been fascinated with Bill Murray—in particular the beloved actor’s adventures off-screen, which rival his filmography for sheer entertainment value. Edwards traveled to the places where Murray has lived, worked, and partied, in search of the most outrageous and hilarious Bill Murray stories from the past four decades, many of which have never before been reported. Bill once paid a child five dollars to ride his bike into a swimming pool. The star convinced Harvard’s JV women’s basketball team to play with him in a private game of hoops. Many of these surreal encounters ended with Bill whispering, “No one will ever believe you” into a stranger’s ear. But The Tao of Bill Murray is more than just a collection of wacky anecdotes. This volume puts the actor’s public clowning into a larger context, as Edwards distills Murray’s unique way of being into a set of guiding principles. A sideways mix of comedy and philosophy, full of photo bombs, late-night party crashes, and movie-set antics, this is the perfect book for anyone who calls themselves a Bill Murray fan—which is to say, everyone.

Kirkus Review points out, “The key to Murray’s philosophy is that it is not self-serving. Though he has become known for his carefree antics almost as much as for his acting roles, he does them out of earnest playfulness. “
Bill

What Does Bill Murray Smell Like? This Scratch-N-Sniff Will Let You Find Out

3049769-slide-s-1-a-scratch-n-sniff-guide-to-bill-murray                                         Life Aquatic by Sabrina Elliot

“A NEW BOOK ALLOWS YOU TO BASK IN THE REDOLENT BOUQUET OF A HOLLYWOOD TREASURE.” writes John Brownlee at Fast Company.

3049769-slide-s-3-a-scratch-n-sniff-guide-to-bill-murray                                   Lost in Translation by Henry Kaye

“Bill Murray is one of the most elusive and enigmatic actors in Hollywood, but what does he smell like? Cook Your Own Food is a new scratch and sniff tribute to the Ghostbusters and Scrooged actor that allows you to bask in Murray’s fragrant, ever-changing musk. It’s the literary equivalent of sticking your head under Murray’s armpit and inhaling deeply.”

3049769-slide-s-4-a-scratch-n-sniff-guide-to-bill-murray                                Moonrise Kingdom by Witzje Valkemar

“Published by the self-described “nomadic publisher” Sugoi Press, Cook Your Own Food – A Bill Murray Scratch And Sniff features 10 different pages drawn by 10 different artists featuring 10 different smells inspired by an assortment of Bill Murray films. It’s the next best thing to using a time machine to travel back to the set of his best movies and smell him for yourself.”

3049769-slide-s-2-a-scratch-n-sniff-guide-to-bill-murray                                      Lost in Translation by Grace Danico

“One page illustrated by Grace Danico featuring Bill Murray’s Suntory hawking character in Lost in Translation might smell like whiskey; another page, illustrating the scene from the same movie when Murray and Scarlett Johansson go out for dinner, would smell like sushi. Other pages feature smells from Moonrise Kingdom, Groundhog’s Day, The Life Aquatic, What About Bob? and more.”

3049769-slide-s-5-a-scratch-n-sniff-guide-to-bill-murray                                     What about Bob by Jon Boam

“But why Bill Murray, of all people? “Bill Murray really lends himself to re-interpretation,” says John Jarvis of Sugoi Press. “He has everything: the sadness, the hilarity, the weight. You just need to turn on your laptop and you’re bombarded with illustrations of him. We wanted to add a layer on top, bring people closer to him. So now you can eat sushi with him, chomp on apples with him, and eat a Baby Ruth with him.”

You can buy a copy of Cook Your Own Food – A Bill Murray Scratch And Sniff now from Sugoi Press for a little under $10 here.”

The Sugoi site  says “Feel closer to the greatest man alive! Delve into his scenes, drink with him, laugh with him and smell as he smells.We’ve brought together some amazing artists to re-interpret some classic Bill Murray films. Focusing on his culinary habits.Scratch the smelly pads at the top right and enter the world of Bill Murray.”