Tag Archives: Mel Gibson

“Make It Cool Or I’ll Kill You” — The Apocalyptic Cars of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

“In the MAD MAX world they worship machinery,” says Director/Screenwriter/Producer George Miller in this featurette about the insane vehicles in MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. To deliver these incredible machines, Miller turned to production designer Colin Gibson, saying “Make it cool or I’ll kill you.”1250584678943245483Gibson treated the assignment as if he were casting actors, looking for individuality and distinctive traits. “We wanted to find things that were iconic,” Gibson tells Jalopnik. “Cars that had a particular resonance in Australia, and then design them as the boys would’ve.” 1250584678635445931The cars needed to look right, but they also had to perform. “Cars were a metaphor for power,” says Gibson. “Forget about hunkering down in a bunker—come the end of the world, steal a V-8, steal a gun, you’re gonna last a little longer.”  Miller insisted on everything being practical: “We decided to shoot the film old school, with real vehicles and real people,” he says.1250584679344646827“The vehicles are almost an extension of the characters,” Miller continues. As a result the film is filled with “cars brimming with personality and with an absolute minimum of technology,” writes Damon Lavrinc in Jalopnik. “They had to be shells to impose and convey each of the character’s motivations – stars unto themselves that could stand alone, and also stand up to the sheer lunacy of what Miller had planned.”1250584679088716459Case in point: Charlize Theron’s War Rig, shown above, being attacked by men on long, high tensile steel poles. Those are stuntmen on the poles, not mannequins or CGI humans.1250584679022559403Gibson says, “We basically tried to build the vehicles the way it would have been done in the apocalypse.” His guys built 88 individual cars; at the end of the day, counting backup cars plus the variations that got blown up or ripped apart, they created 150 vehicles in all. 1250584679257699243The film was photographed by John Seale (THE ENGLISH PATIENT, WITNESS, DEAD POET’S SOCIETY) who came out of retirement to shoot the picture. His goal was to immerse the viewer in the action. “It’s always been a part of my work philosophy to…make it as smooth as possible for the audience to view it, because I feel if you can do that you’re going to suck the audience out of their seat and… put them in the situation. And you’ve got to hold them there, you know?” Seale tells Hitfix. “This was all part of George’s philosophy, to get them in the movie in the first two shots and hold them there for another 112 minutes.”1250584679496028331Tom Hardy stars in the title role (originated by Mel Gibson.) He’s joined by Charlize Theron, Nicholas Hoult, Rosie Huntington-Whitely, and Zoe Kravitz.safe_image

A Gorgeous Supercut: 120 Years of Cinema

-1Youtube is littered with tribute videos that review the history of cinema, but this one is something special. French editor Joris Faucon Grimaud has created an inspired tour thru the last 120 years of film. You will see over 300 of your favorite movie moments, some of which  you had forgotten. Most are from Hollywood films. Grimaud makes surprising connections that give each shot added meaning and context.

Thanks to Oktay Ege Kozak over at The Playlist for bringing it to our attention.

Here’s the list of films included:

Une scène au jardin de Roundhay
La Sortie de l’usine Lumière à Lyon
L’Arrivée d’un train en gare de La Ciotat
Lover of Beauty
Edison’s Films
Edison’s The Kiss
Le Voyage dans la Lune
The Great Train Robbery
The General
Les Vampires
The Birth of a Nation
Intolerance
Pandora’s Box
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
The Kid
Broken Blossoms
Way Down East
Nanook of the North
The Phantom of Opera
The Golden Age
Sunrise
Strike
Battleship Potemkin
Metropolis
Citizen Kane
La Belle et La Bête
The Dictator
Le Quai des Brumes
The  Wizard of Oz
City Lights
M
The Seven Samurai
Rashōmon
A Date with Judy
Sunset Boulevard
Frankenstein
The Night of the Hunter
Witness for the Prosecution
La Dolce Vita
Singing in the Rain
12 Angry Men
Psycho
Casablanca
Double Indemnity
All About Eve
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
Gone With The Wind
It’s a Wonderful Life
Paths of Glory
Rebel Without a Cause
To Kill a Mockingbird
The 400 Blows
La grande vadrouille
Les Tontons Flingueurs
Belle de Jour
La Piscine
It Happened One Night
Vertigo
Dr. Strangelove
North by Northwest
Lawrence of Arabia
Lolita
Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Contempt
Breathless
Some Like It Hot
Manhattan
Mad Max
Top Gun
Taxi Driver
Goodfellas
The Godfather
Raging Bull
Once Upon Time in America
The Godfather II
Apocalypse Now
Full Metal Jacket
The Thin Red Line
Platoon
Hook
Schindler’s List
Once Upon Time in The West
The Good, The Bad, The Ugly
The Quick and the Dead
Stagecoach
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Little Big Man
Dances With Wolves
Giant
Rio Bravo
The Wild Bunch
Dead Man
Unforgiven
3:10 to Yuma
No Country for Old Men
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
True Grit
Django Unchained
Fantasia
Snow White
Cinderella
Alice in Wonderland
Dumbo
The Sword in the Stone
Pinocchio
The Lion King
Sleeping Beauty
Balto
The Jungle Book
Aladdin
Peter Pan
Mulan
Tarzan
Princess Mononoké
The Nightmare Before Christmas
Fantastic Mr. Fox
Spirited Away
Lady and the Tramp
Beauty and the Beast
Corpse Bride
Bambi
The Fox and the Hound
How to Train Your Dragon
Pocahontas
Toy Story
Monsters, Inc.
Finding Nemo
The Incredibles
Wall-E
Up
Toy Story 3
Fight Club
Terminator 2: Judgment Day
Jurassic Park
Men in Black
Requiem For A Dream
Reservoir Dogs
A.I.
Pulp Fiction
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
The Matrix
Spiderman 2
Lord of The Rings
Star Wars: The Phantom Menace
Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone
X-Men 2
American History X
Dr. No
Casino Royal
Star Wars:The Revenge of The Sith
Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows
Kick Ass
Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban
Minority Report
The Shining
A Nightmare on Elm Street
Saw
Insidious
Watchmen
300
Transformers: The Dark Side of The Moon
Harry Potter and The Deadly Hallows part 2
The Avengers
Mission Impossible III
Saving Private Ryan
There Will Be Blood
V for Vendetta
Avatar
Star Trek: Insurrection
Die Hard
Léon
Titanic
Alien
Edward Scissorhands
Sin City
Eyes Wide Shut
Yves Saint Laurent
The Beat That My Heart Skipped
Usual Suspects
Basic Instinct
Brokeback Mountain
Kill Bill
Secret Window
Little White Lies
The Shawshank Redemption
Birdman
Drive
La Vie en Rose
The Wolf of Wall Street
Interstellar
Man of Steel
Batman Begins
The Dark Knight
The Dark Knight Rises
Batman
Batman Returns
The Godfather
Jaws
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back
Taxi Driver
Back to The Future
Rain Man
Scarface
2001 A Space Odyssey
The Tree of Life
Pulp Fiction
Lost Highway
Heat
Forrest Gump
La Haine
A Clockwork Orange
The Big Lebowski
Donnie Darko
The Notebook
Dirty Dancing
Mulholland Drive
Braveheart
Blade Runner
Gladiator
Se7en
The Artist
American Beauty
Amélie
The Great Gatsby
Black Swan

 

Cannes 2015 – “You never look as ugly as you do in a selfie”

2015-cannes-film-festival-poster-fb-640x320

The lineup for the Cannes Film Festival 2015 was announced today in Paris. The festival begins on May 13 with a jury chaired by Joel and Ethan Coen.

Reportage of the announcement has been varied, but the most unique news item concerns selfies. The Telegraph leads its article with the festival’s ban of red-carpet selfies, quoting festival director Thierry Frémaux: “We think it’s ridiculous and grotesque and really slows things down,” he officially declared, adding, “you never look as ugly as you do in a selfie.”

As always there is a wide ranging mix of international films and stars on display. Some outlets celebrate actors, others auteurs.  People zeroes in on the stars in attendance, under the banner “Charlize Theron, Emma Stone, Natalie Portman Headline Star-Studded Festival Slate.” The article goes on to mention Joaquin Phoenix, Matthew McConaughey, Rooney Mara, Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jesse Eisenberg, Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Salma Hayek,  Rachel Weisz and others. The Huffington Post, on the other hand, concentrates on “cinema heavyweights including China’s Jia Zhangke, Italy’s Paolo Sorrentino and the United States’ Gus Van Sant.”

No surprise to see the parochial nature of some of the journalism; national interests drive regional reporting. The Guardian sulks, bemoaning the almost total absence of British directors: “Asif Kapadia’s documentary Amy, about Amy Winehouse, has been selected for a midnight screening, but there are no British directors elsewhere.”

Down Under, news.com.au cheers on Cate Blanchett and Naomi Watts. Strangely, the Aussie site also promotes the out of competition screening of George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road” with a photo of Mel Gibson, who originated the role, instead of a photo of Tom Hardy, who stars in this reboot.

Variety notes that “Asia will enjoy its strongest competition presence in some time with Our Little Sister,” a Japanese comicstrip adaptation from Hirokazu Kore-eda; “Mountains May Depart,” a three-part drama from mainland Chinese auteur Jia Zhangke; and “The Assassin,” a long-gestating martial-arts epic from Taiwan’s Hou Hsiao-hsien. Cannes 2015 also looks to be a robust edition for Italian filmmakers, with Palme bridesmaids Matteo Garrone (“The Tale of Tales,” a lavish, effects-driven fantasy starring Salma Hayek, Vincent Cassel and John C. Reilly) and Sorrentino (“Youth,” toplining Michael Caine and featuring Weisz, Jane Fonda, Paul Dano and Harvey Keitel) duking it out with Palme laureate Nanni Moretti, back with his semi-autobiographical drama “My Mother.”

The official festival poster features Ingrid Bergman this year. Some journalists, such as Brad Brevet at Rope of Silicon, are underwhelmed by this design, preferring the style of  posters from the past few years. 2014 presented Marcello Mastroianni, 2013 had a great photo of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, 2012 delivered a striking shot of Marilyn Monroe, and 2011 showed a sophisticated Faye Dunaway. Each one combines text and image in a powerful graphic interplay. Each one epitomizes cinematic glamour; no selfies here. Check them out below: 2014-cannes-film-festival-poster2013-cannes-film-festival-poster cannes-poster-2012-marilyn-monroe_02282012_234555 cannesposterlargecannes_2015